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Take your Hands off my Reefer: Jeff Sessions begins to restore enforcement of cannabis laws

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The “guidance” Sessions refers to here is the August 29, 2013 policy guidance memorandum issued by the then-Deputy Attorney General James Cole. This former memo sought to “tune” the enforcement and prosecution of the law and the crimes against that law, as regards marijuana sales, possession and use.

Cannabis is illegal on the Federal books. This is a Federal statute that applies to the United States of America as a whole.  However, there has long been a push to legalize this substance, and what President Obama did, through his Deputy AG, was to soften the emphasis on prosecution of crimes involving possession or use of cannabis. The text of the Obama-era policy, written by then Deputy Attorney General James Cole, indicated that the prosecution of such crimes should be limited to these areas:

  • Preventing the distribution of marijuana to minors;
  • Preventing revenue from the sale of marijuana from going to criminal enterprises, gangs, and cartels;
  • Preventing the diversion of marijuana from states where it is legal under state law in some form to other states;
  • Preventing state-authorized marijuana activity from being used as a cover or pretext for the trafficking of other illegal drugs or other illegal activity;
  • Preventing violence and the use of firearms in the cultivation and distribution of marijuana;
  • Preventing drugged driving and the exacerbation of other adverse public health consequences associated with marijuana use;
  • Preventing the growing of marijuana on public lands and the attendant public safety and environmental dangers posed by marijuana production on public lands; and
  • Preventing marijuana possession or use on federal property.

While this list looks very reasonable, what it actually did was to subtly lift the ban on use. Following this directive, so far eight states and the District of Columbia have all made marijuana use completely legal, in violation of the federal statute.  Moreover, in some places a major industry for cannabis agriculture has sprung up.

It is interesting to note that along with “legal” pot agriculture, (called “pot grows” in my old home state of Colorado), there are a great many illegal grows on land that appears to be National Forest and reserved lands as well.  The industry is booming, of course. Colorado and no doubt other states, have tried to use this new legality as a tax revenue stream.  The most amazing thing is that the revenue from such business activity is directed at… the school system. The results? Watch, and… wait for it…

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Culture

Jada Pinkett Smith & Willow Talked About Her Self Harming Herself After Willow’s Hit Song …

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Jada Pinkett Smith — who was accompanied by her mother Adrienne Banfield-Jones — revealed she and Willow, 17, had “talked” about the moment after the teenager admitted on Red Table Talk she had been self-harming after achieving success with her 2010 single “Whip My Hair.”

“I wanted to make sure she was okay,” Jada Pinkett Smith said. “We went through what happened and in the moment I realized as a mother you also have to give your children space to deal with their own shadow.”

The Girls Trip star said she chose to pay attention to the positive things that came from Willow’s revelation.

“I focused more on how she got herself out versus what got her there,” she said. “I was most proud about that she could share it in the way she did, which let me know she had come through in a major way that she could put it on the table like that.”

“I wanted to focus on what [it was] that got her through,” the actress explained. “I really talked to her about her powering side of her journey and give her all the praise in the world for that part instead of focusing on, ‘Why didn’t you tell me?’”

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Video of #Dallas9 released from Tarrant County

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Dallas officer Amber Guyger arrested on manslaughter charge in Botham Jean shooting posted $300,000 bond and released

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The Dallas police officer who shot and killed a man Thursday evening after police said she went to the wrong apartment has been arrested on a manslaughter charge, officials confirmed Sunday.

The officer, identified as Amber Guyger, 30, is a four-year-veteran of the force. The victim has been identified as Botham Shem Jean, 26.

Guyger was booked into the Kaufman County Jail about 7:20 p.m. Sunday, according to online records. She posted a $300,000 bond and was going to be released from custody shortly, jail officials said.

Later Sunday night, Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings released a statement thanking police and the Texas Rangers for a thorough investigation that led to an arrest.

“I am grateful to Dallas Police Chief Renee Hall for her leadership and foresight in calling for the Rangers to handle the investigation to ensure there was no appearance of bias,” his statement read in part.

The Rangers had taken over the investigation and obtained the manslaughter warrant from the 7th District Court in Dallas County, said Lt. Lonny Haschel, Texas Department of Public Safety spokesman.

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