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A man deported to Iraq, where he’d never lived. He died from lack of insulin, family says.

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Jimmy Aldaoud crouched on a sidewalk, miserable, hungry and short on insulin. The 41-year-old with diabetes and severe mental illness had spent nearly his whole life in Detroit until just over two months ago, when Immigration and Customs Enforcement deported him to Iraq — a country he’d never set foot in.

“I don’t understand the language,” Aldaoud said in an undated video shared to Facebook on Wednesday night. “I’m sleeping in the street. I’m diabetic. I take insulin shots. I’ve been throwing up, throwing up, sleeping in the street, trying to find something to eat. I’ve got nothing over here.”

This week, Aldaoud died in Baghdad, his family and the American Civil Liberties Union told Politico, which first reported on his case. They believe his inability to obtain insulin was the cause of death.

Aldaoud’s supporters say he never should have been sent to a country short on health care and racked with civil unrest, especially as he’s a member of the Chaldean Catholic community, which has faced violent persecution since the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq.

“This is a total failure of the whole immigration system,” Edward Bajoka, a Detroit immigration attorney and friend of Aldaoud’s family, told The Washington Post. “This guy should have been protected somewhere along the way.”

His death comes as the Trump administration ramps up immigration enforcement, a move highlighted on Wednesday as hundreds were arrested in a massive raid. While most of the national argument has focused on undocumented immigrants from Mexico and Central America, Aldaoud’s case shows the plight of hundreds of Iraqi Christians who could soon face a forced return to the dangerous nation.

“Jimmy Aldaoud . . . should have never been sent to Iraq,” Rep. Andy Levin (D-Mich.) told Politico. “My Republican colleagues and I have repeatedly called on the executive branch to cease deportation of such vulnerable people. Now, someone has died.”

 

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Group protesting ICE outside prison says guard drove truck into protesters, injuring 2

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A group that protested outside a prison in Rhode Island says two of their members were injured Wednesday night after a corrections officer drove his truck into the group.

Never Again Action, a Jewish activist group that was protesting federal immigration policies and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, posted a video on social media that showed a black pick-up truck driving into protesters who were sitting in front of the prison’s parking lot entrance.

The video shows the truck approaching the parking lot and turning right into the entrance before stopping in front of the line of people.

The crowd stood up in reaction as the car stopped. The driver then honked the horn before moving forward into the group of people.

Two protesters were taken to the hospital for injuries suffered from the vehicle, Never Again Action said on social media.

Video then shows other officers rush toward the crowd and use pepper spray to disperse the group. Three other protesters were hospitalized for “severe pepper spray exposure,” the group said, adding that none of the injuries were life-threatening.

The incident occurred in Central Falls at the Donald W. Wyatt Detention Facility, which is used by federal immigration officials.

Aaron Regunberg, a former state representative and organizer with Never Again Action, said the corrections officer behind the wheel was in uniform when he drove into the line of people, which video from the protest shows. The officer was not arrested, Regunberg said.

“It was very clearly deliberate,” Regunberg told USA TODAY.

Reached by phone Thursday by USA TODAY, a prison employee declined to comment.

Read More at USA TODAY

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6 Philadelphia Police Officers Shot During Gun Battle In Nicetown-Tioga Section

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PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — At least six Philadelphia police officers were shot during a gun battle in Philadelphia’s Nicetown-Tioga section and rushed to the hospital on Wednesday afternoon, authorities say. Two officers and three others who were trapped inside the home with the shooter were safely evacuated several hours after the standoff began. The gunman surrendered just after midnight.

“We have gone from a hostage situation to a barricade,” Philadelphia Police Commissioner Richard Ross said.

Ross said that the two officers and three others inside the home took fire during the incident.

All six officers wounded in the shooting have been released from the hospital. Another officer injured in a car crash on the way to the scene still remains hospitalized.

Sources tell CBS3 the suspect was live-streaming some of the shootout while he barricaded himself inside the home.

Read More Here at CBS Philly

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Statue of Liberty shown cuffed and arrested by immigration officials in new mural

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A mural of the Statue of Liberty, handcuffed and slammed on the hood of a police cruiser, is drawing attention in downtown Las Vegas, a day after a top Trump administration official in charge of immigration suggested the statue’s famous inscription be amended to include a test of means.

Under the pseudonym Recycled Propaganda, artist and British immigrant Izaac Zevalking painted the image on a wall late last month, before citizenship and immigration services director Ken Cuccinelli – jokingly – suggested amending Emma Lazarus’s sonnet inscribed on the statue to read: “Give me your tired and your poor who can stand on their own two feet and who will not become a public charge.”

Zevalking told Las Vegas station KTNV: “My purpose of doing what I did with the Statue of Liberty is to try and draw analogies with America’s past and how it was founded and how it was largely built by immigrants, to really make an analogy out of that so that people can apply that to contemporary society and contemporary issues a little bit more.”

Since Cuccinelli made his suggestion to NPR, administration officials have sought to play down its significance.

The White House adviser Stephen Miller said he wouldn’t “get off into a whole thing about history here”. But he added: “The Statue of Liberty is a symbol of American liberty lighting the world. The poem that you’re referring to was added later and is not actually part of the original Statue of Liberty.”

Still, the exchange underscores the change last week in administration policy toward immigrants applying for permanent residency status or green card. Under the new rules, immigration services will be able to reject applicants who have spent more than a year on food stamps, Medicaid or other public benefits.

Asked which immigrants will now be welcome to the US, Cuccinelli said: “All immigrants who can stand on their own two feet, self-sufficient, pull themselves up by their boot straps – as in the American tradition.”

Read More Here at Guardian

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